Senior-Care


 

Personal Choice

Many seniors may believe their longevity is a matter of genetics or simple luck. The fact is, a study published by the American Journal of Psychiatry indicates the determining factor in one’s longevity is a person’s personal choice.

The study, which tracked mental and physical health, was conducted over a period of sixty years with nearly 1,000 subjects from various socio-economic backgrounds. Only the factor of clinical depression was deemed to be outside the control of subjects in regard to their longevity.

The study identified the following factors, all of which were considered to be personal choices, as being the most important in determining an individual’s longevity. They were:

Exercise – Experts recommend 30 minutes of regular exercise.

No Smoking – The list of smoking-related health problems is too long to list. If you smoke, quit.

Appropriate Weight – Obesity can contribute to heart disease, diabetes, and joint problems.

Positive Coping Mechanisms – Learning how to deal with stress and control anger is essential.

Stable Marriage – Research shows happily married people have less illness and longer lives.

Moderate Alcohol Intake – The key term is moderate. Excessive alcohol intake can cause liver problems and possible harmful drug interactions.

Depressive Illness – While this is the one factor found to be outside an individual’s ability to make a choice, it is strongly recommended a person seek treatment when feeling depressed.

So, there you have it. It’s the personal choices we make with regard to these factors that are the most important in our longevity. Of course, there are many other factors such as acquired disease and accidents that can play a role. But, for the majority of individuals, it is the choices we make.

Happy Thanksgiving

Sometimes things just work out for the best. Having just returned from some travels recently, my wife and I had not made plans for Thanksgiving. Last week the phone started ringing and we now have at least a dozen or so family members spending much of the Thanksgiving holiday with us. We are very blessed. I wish all of you who read this blog a very happy holiday.  

 www.TheBestofOurLives.com

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Senior-Care 2011

MetLife Mature Market Institute recently released the results of their annual survey. It reports the cost of senior care has once again gone up in 2011. Surprised? Of course not. The way this economy has been mishandled by virtually every player is quite obvious.  

As seniors, we appear to be on a collision course with such high costs for care, it puts into jeopardy our future financial security as well as that of our loved ones. For example, the average private nursing home room currently costs $229 a day. That totals $87,235 a year, up 4.4 per cent. The average assisted living cost is $3,477 a month. That totals $41,724 a year, up 5.6 per cent. Even adult day-care currently costs an average of $79 a day, up 4.5 per cent.

If you are looking for a bargain in senior-care, you might consider rural Louisiana. The cost of  living in a nursing home there is a mere $141 per day. If you have money to burn on your senior-care, head to Alaska. The cost of living in a nursing home there is currently $655 per day. I’m sure that includes all the salmon you can eat.

www.TheBestofOurLives.com

 

 www.TheBestofOurLives.com